Other Oculoplastic Procedures

Be, Look, & Feel Your Very Best!

Other Oculoplastic Procedures

As a board-certified and fellowship-trained ophthalmologist, Dr. Stephen Jones specializes in a variety of oculoplastic procedures and is devoted to caring for his patient’s individual needs.

Ptosis

Ptosis –  which is also known as “drooping eyelid,” may be due to excess skin and fat, a weakness of muscles or damage to the nerves of the muscles controlling the eyelid.

The most common cause of “droopy” eyelids is from excess skin and fat that which create a heavy appearance and weights the eyelids. When skin extends beyond the upper eyelid margin it may interfere with vision. In some cases, the levator muscle that lifts the eyelid may be not be functioning properly causing the lip to droop.

If you suffer from droopy eyelids, schedule an appointment with Dr. Jones, so he can evaluate your eyes and suggest an appropriate treatment option for you.

Rather speak to someone in person? Call us at 239-936-4706, option 4. Day or night, we’re available to speak to you.

Eyelid Malposition – Ectropion and Entropion

If you have ever felt an eyelash in your eye, you can imagine how irritating it would be to have an inward turning eyelid.  This experience is not only irritating, but can lead to a serious, visually threatening infection. Similarly, an outward turning eyelid may result in tearing, redness, mattering and irritation. An outward turning eyelid may cause permanent damage from exposure of the eyeball, occlusion of the tear duct and scarring.   If the eyelid is turning outward, this is referred to as “ectropion” and an eyelid that is curled inward is referred to as “entropion.”

Eyelid malpositions are the result tendon laxity at the inner and outer corners (canthi) of the eyelid.  In addition to canthal support, the eyelids are supported by “retractors” that open the eyelids. The retractors are tendon extensions of the vertical muscles surrounding the eyeball. Thus, when you look up or downward, the eyelids follow your gaze. When the retractors are pathologically altered, eyelid malpositions may occur.

The goal in treating a given eyelid malposition is to reposition the eyelid so that the new healing forces will overcome the pathologic forces.  The common approaches include eyelid and canthal tendon tightening, eyelid retractor advancement or recession and skin grafting or transposition flaps.

Ectropion and Entropion procedures are performed in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia and light sedation.  Most patients experience very little pain and will have some swelling will for up to a week after surgery which can be minimized with an ice pack. Most swelling and/or bruising are resolved after two weeks, but a small amount may be present for up to six weeks after surgery.

If you think you may be experiencing an eyelid malposition, schedule an appointment with Dr. Jones, so he can evaluate your eyes and suggest an appropriate treatment option for you.

Rather speak to someone in person? Call us at 239-936-4706, option 4. Day or night, we’re available to speak to you.

Eyelid and Orbital Tumors

Tumors that commonly involve the eyelid and its surrounding structures usually require a surgical procedure to diagnose and/or treat. Small tumors. The earliest signs of most tumors are a progressive lump, bleeding, texture change, irregular pigmentation or surrounding tissue destruction. In some cases, tumors will exert a secondary effect on the surrounding normal tissues, such as when an eyelid contour defect occurs or if the eyeball is pushed forward. In these cases, when the underlying tumor is removed the secondary problem should resolve.  Many times, these potential tumors may be identified during an annual eye exam.  In many cases, imaging studies are necessary to determine the full extent of the tumor and suggest the best surgical approach and a surgical biopsy is necessary to confirm the correct diagnosis.  The removal of a tumor typically leaves a tissue defect that will require some form of reconstruction which may include direct closure, skin grafts, flaps and implant procedures.

If you have been told that you might have an eyelid or orbital tumor, schedule an appointment with Dr. Jones, so he can evaluate your condition, perform the necessary diagnostic tests and suggest an appropriate treatment option for you.

Rather speak to someone in person? Call us at 239-936-4706, option 4. Day or night, we’re available to speak to you.

Enucleation

Eye removal may be necessary due to ocular pain, glaucoma, trauma, globe shrinkage, infections, inflammation or tumors. There are two types of eye removal; enucleation where the entire eye is removed and evisceration where the inner contents are removed leaving the “white” of the eye intact.
When an eye is removed, the volume of the globe must be replaced or the remaining socket will appear “sunken.” A spherical implant is typically buried in the socket. the appearance of a normal eye is created by the false eye, which is worn behind the eyelids like a large contact lens, to fill the remaining volume.

The removal of an eye may be performed in an outpatient or inpatient (hospital) setting. Due to the potentially painful early post-operative period you will be receive an appropriate pain medication based on your individual pain tolerance.  The purpose for hospitalization is for pain control and once your comfort can be maintained on oral medications alone, you will be allowed to return home. Most inpatient hospital stays are less than three days.

If you are suffering from a condition that might require eye removal, schedule an appointment with Dr. Jones, so he can evaluate your eye condition and suggest an appropriate treatment option for you.

Rather speak to someone in person? Call us at 239-936-4706, option 4. Day or night, we’re available to speak to you.

Contact Us

Contact us if you have questions and we will respond back as soon as possible.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search

LASIK Fall Special: $1500 OFF!Learn More
+ +